Over the next several weeks, Vital Signs will feature introductions to many of the 40 new faculty members and four chief residents who are joining us this year. Each has been asked to provide some background about their primary professional focus in clinical, research, and/or medical education, what drew them to...

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Medicine is rapidly approaching an accelerated advance that will augment or replace drugs with human cells for treating a range of intractable conditions, according to Jacques Galipeau, MD, professor, Hematology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care and associate dean for therapeutics discovery and development.

During a June 26, 2018 meeting...

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For some athletes, exercise-induced gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) makes engaging in a favorite sport an experience in misery. 

An article in Everyday Health about the condition quoted Sumona Saha, MD, MS, associate professor (CHS), Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 

"There are certain activities that can trigger reflux, and exercise is one...

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The proportion of women graduating from medical school has increased from 6.9 percent in 1966 to 43.6 percent in 2016, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges. But only 22 percent of full professors in clinical departments of medical schools are women, and women comprise 13 percent of permanent chairs among clinical...

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The National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is the primary funding agency for biomedical research in the United States, is using a venture capital-style approach to find and fund unconventional studies that hold potential to transform the medical field. 

This week, three UW-Madison faculty members were awarded a total of more...

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An office building on Midvale Boulevard is the workplace home of a small team of software developers, bioinformatics experts, and database administrators. Led by Adam Halstead, MS, the Software Development and Informatics Services group provides technical applications to advance the administrative, educational, and research missions of the Department of...

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Photo (above): Department of Medicine faculty awards were presented during a ceremony on October 3, 2018. Front row, R to L: Dr. Rashmi Agni, Dr. Alexis Eastman, Dr. Jeremy Smith, Dr. Vincent Cryns. Back row, R to L: Dr. Andrea Schnell, Dr. Tripti Singh, Dr. Ann Schmidt, Dr. Mark Burkard. Not...

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Upper respiratory infections can leave patients in temporary misery, and it's important for them to understand why antibiotics are not helpful for viral infections. In an article for UW Health, Barry Fox, MD (pictured at right), clinical professor, Infectious Disease and medical director of the UW Health Antimicrobial Stewardship Program,...
Perhaps you have a family member or friend who wants to quit smoking, lose weight, or eat better. How can you help them? Providers and loved ones alike often struggle with the best strategies to identify and support health-promoting lifestyle changes by patients contemplating a commitment to actions such as...
Recent research on sleep and its effects on memory disorders suggest that the two are linked in unexpected ways. Sleep helps consolidate memories, pruning out what’s not important and storing or reinforcing the neural networks for more important information, explained Steven Barczi, MD (pictured above and at upper right), professor...
A five-year, $3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute will support physician-researcher Dustin Deming, MD , assistant professor, Hematology, Medical Oncology, and Palliative Care and colleagues in their pursuit of more effective treatments for patients living with colorectal cancer. The study will involve growing colon cancer cells from patient-derived...
A multi-site prospective study led by J. Scott Ferguson, MD , professor (CHS), Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, found that even when guidelines were followed for cleaning and disinfecting flexible bronchoscopes, residual contamination remained in all 24 instruments analyzed. The authors recommend a shift toward the use of sterilized...
On September 13, 2018, the 24th session of the UW School of Medicine and Public Health’s Mini Med School , which offers three public talks per year about medical research and clinical breakthroughs at UW-Madison, brought more than 600 people to campus to hear about improving digestive health. Four speakers...
Observation status - in which hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries are classified as outpatients for billing status – poses an intractable problem for health services and care research. Despite observation stay policies being in place for many years, there wasn’t a standard method that health services researchers could rely on to identify...
Four years ago, patient Mary Gooze learned that her breast cancer had spread to her bones. Undeterred, the 67-year-old retired teacher from the village of Oregon started an effort named One Woman Many Lakes, swimming more than 50 miles in 38 lakes, rivers, bays and oceans to raise awareness and...
More than 110,000 people in Wisconsin are affected by Alzheimer’s disease, and far more are experiencing mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a risk factor for dementia that involves a noticeable decline in memory or thinking. A news story focused on the importance of clinical research on MCI at UW-Madison. Barbara Bendlin,...
Socio-economic factors can affect health in surprising ways. For example: A doctor prescribes insulin for a diabetic patient, but doesn’t ask if the patient has a refrigerator in which to store it. The patient lives in a neighborhood with substandard housing conditions, and a working refrigerator or electricity isn’t a...